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Home > Projects > Case History > Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Desalinate sea water to produce potable water

Home > Projects > Case History > Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Desalinate sea water to produce potable water

Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Desalinate sea water to produce potable water

Management of the Order

ACQUISITION OF THE ORDER

BASIC AND DETAILED ENGINEERING PROJECT

SUPPLY OF MATERIALS

ASSEMBLY

SYSTEM START-UP

OPTIMISATION OF PERFORMANCES

CONSTRUCTION TIME 12 MONTHS

From the heart of the Red Sea, OMC installs a system with 4,000 m3/day capacity, operating on two parallel and independent lines, each with production capacity of 2,000 m3/day.

Pre-treatment

The sea water is conveyed to a collection tank using five wells positioned in various points of the village and sodium hypochlorite is dosed in this tank to inhibit the bacterial load potentially present. Through a lifting station, the sea water is conveyed to the following sand filtering process. Coagulant is dosed in the line before filtration to help removing colloidal substances and reduce the SDI (Silt Density Index) value.

The sand filtering station consists of a set of automatically operated pressure filters in fiberglass. The filtered water is collected in a tank where a certain quantity is used periodically to back flush the sand filters using an independent pumping station; moreover, at the exit of the sand filters, the values of residual chlorine, capacity and SDI are constantly monitored. The filtered water is then pumped to two inverse osmosis units, suitable chemical products are dosed on each line to prevent salt precipitation on osmotic membranes and before entering the inverse osmosis unit, a chemical reducing agent is dosed to eliminate residues of oxidants (needed until that moment), like chlorine.
A safety cartridge filter set with filtering degree of 5 micron is installed on each line supplying water to the inverse osmosis units.

Inverse Osmosis Units

“Inverse” Osmosis is the process that occurs when a saline solution is placed in contact with a membrane permeable to water (and not to dissolved solids) at a pressure exceeding the osmotic pressure of the solution. A solution (permeate) with saline content lower than the initial solution flows through the membrane, while a solution rich of salts (concentrate) is obtained outside the membrane.

The pre-treated water has a residual pressure of about 2- 2.5 bar, suitable to feed the inverse osmosis units. An energy recovery unit is installed in each inverse osmosis train.

This system does not require maintenance and is called Pressure Exchanger. The installed PX system is a direct movement unit that reduces the capacity of the high-pressure delivery pump with remarkable energy saving (around 40%). The energy produced by the concentrate transfers its pressure to a supply flow of the same capacity, conveyed towards the unit. Despite this operation takes place with very high efficiency, an auxiliary pump is required to increase the value of the delivery pressure to the osmotic modules by about 3 bar.

Post-treatment

All the water produced is conveyed to a large collection tank where, in order to ensure potability, sodium hypochlorite is dosed for the final disinfection and sodium hydroxide for the correction of pH and alkalinity.

Supervision and Control System

In the above described desalination system, the on-site instruments guarantee the constant monitoring of process parameters, managed by the automation and control panel. The control and supervision software is supplied and the operator station, which includes a PC, monitors operations with graphic pages that show the system’s layout and control points, and a printer. The supervision software allows monitoring and complete interaction with the process through graphic colour pages that show the layout of the system’s flow, the various operating machines and field instruments; in addition, supervision can also be performed from a remote station.

Membrane Rinsing and Cleaning System

The progressive clogging of osmotic modules can take place over time despite due precautions, effective pre-treatment and proper maintenance of the system.

The membrane clogging period depends on the efficiency of the pre-treatment system and efficacy of the anti-precipitating agent used. There are only a few systems that never require washing procedures and systems where said operations are required only once a year or even once every two years. In any case, OMC recommends to perform regular washing operations, at least once-twice a year to maintain the membranes in perfectly efficient conditions.

The membranes must be washed during their initial clogging stage.

Washing is recommended when one or more of the following parameters vary between 10 – 15%

– increase of the permeate’s conductivity

– increase of the pressure difference

– increase of the delivery pressure

– decrease of production

This chemical washing operation of the membranes is generally performed in about 2 hours.

Related Products

Reverse Osmosis

 

Filtration

 

Contact US


I ACCEPT I declare that I have read and accepted the privacy policy pursuant to art. 13 of Legislative Decree no. 196/2003 and I consent to the processing of personal data for promotional and commercial purposes.

From the heart of the Red Sea, OMC installs a system with 4,000 m3/day capacity, operating on two parallel and independent lines, each with production capacity of 2,000 m3/day.

Pre-treatment

The sea water is conveyed to a collection tank using five wells positioned in various points of the village and sodium hypochlorite is dosed in this tank to inhibit the bacterial load potentially present. Through a lifting station, the sea water is conveyed to the following sand filtering process. Coagulant is dosed in the line before filtration to help removing colloidal substances and reduce the SDI (Silt Density Index) value.

The sand filtering station consists of a set of automatically operated pressure filters in fiberglass. The filtered water is collected in a tank where a certain quantity is used periodically to back flush the sand filters using an independent pumping station; moreover, at the exit of the sand filters, the values of residual chlorine, capacity and SDI are constantly monitored. The filtered water is then pumped to two inverse osmosis units, suitable chemical products are dosed on each line to prevent salt precipitation on osmotic membranes and before entering the inverse osmosis unit, a chemical reducing agent is dosed to eliminate residues of oxidants (needed until that moment), like chlorine.
A safety cartridge filter set with filtering degree of 5 micron is installed on each line supplying water to the inverse osmosis units.

Inverse Osmosis Units

“Inverse” Osmosis is the process that occurs when a saline solution is placed in contact with a membrane permeable to water (and not to dissolved solids) at a pressure exceeding the osmotic pressure of the solution. A solution (permeate) with saline content lower than the initial solution flows through the membrane, while a solution rich of salts (concentrate) is obtained outside the membrane.

The pre-treated water has a residual pressure of about 2- 2.5 bar, suitable to feed the inverse osmosis units. An energy recovery unit is installed in each inverse osmosis train.

This system does not require maintenance and is called Pressure Exchanger. The installed PX system is a direct movement unit that reduces the capacity of the high-pressure delivery pump with remarkable energy saving (around 40%). The energy produced by the concentrate transfers its pressure to a supply flow of the same capacity, conveyed towards the unit. Despite this operation takes place with very high efficiency, an auxiliary pump is required to increase the value of the delivery pressure to the osmotic modules by about 3 bar.

Post-treatment

All the water produced is conveyed to a large collection tank where, in order to ensure potability, sodium hypochlorite is dosed for the final disinfection and sodium hydroxide for the correction of pH and alkalinity.

Supervision and Control System

In the above described desalination system, the on-site instruments guarantee the constant monitoring of process parameters, managed by the automation and control panel. The control and supervision software is supplied and the operator station, which includes a PC, monitors operations with graphic pages that show the system’s layout and control points, and a printer. The supervision software allows monitoring and complete interaction with the process through graphic colour pages that show the layout of the system’s flow, the various operating machines and field instruments; in addition, supervision can also be performed from a remote station.

Membrane Rinsing and Cleaning System

The progressive clogging of osmotic modules can take place over time despite due precautions, effective pre-treatment and proper maintenance of the system.

The membrane clogging period depends on the efficiency of the pre-treatment system and efficacy of the anti-precipitating agent used. There are only a few systems that never require washing procedures and systems where said operations are required only once a year or even once every two years. In any case, OMC recommends to perform regular washing operations, at least once-twice a year to maintain the membranes in perfectly efficient conditions.

The membranes must be washed during their initial clogging stage.

Washing is recommended when one or more of the following parameters vary between 10 – 15%

– increase of the permeate’s conductivity

– increase of the pressure difference

– increase of the delivery pressure

– decrease of production

This chemical washing operation of the membranes is generally performed in about 2 hours.

Management of the Order

ACQUISITION OF THE ORDER

BASIC AND DETAILED ENGINEERING PROJECT

SUPPLY OF MATERIALS

ASSEMBLY

SYSTEM START-UP

OPTIMISATION OF PERFORMANCES

CONSTRUCTION TIME 12 MONTHS

From the heart of the Red Sea, OMC installs a system with 4,000 m3/day capacity, operating on two parallel and independent lines, each with production capacity of 2,000 m3/day.

Pre-treatment

The sea water is conveyed to a collection tank using five wells positioned in various points of the village and sodium hypochlorite is dosed in this tank to inhibit the bacterial load potentially present. Through a lifting station, the sea water is conveyed to the following sand filtering process. Coagulant is dosed in the line before filtration to help removing colloidal substances and reduce the SDI (Silt Density Index) value.

The sand filtering station consists of a set of automatically operated pressure filters in fiberglass. The filtered water is collected in a tank where a certain quantity is used periodically to back flush the sand filters using an independent pumping station; moreover, at the exit of the sand filters, the values of residual chlorine, capacity and SDI are constantly monitored. The filtered water is then pumped to two inverse osmosis units, suitable chemical products are dosed on each line to prevent salt precipitation on osmotic membranes and before entering the inverse osmosis unit, a chemical reducing agent is dosed to eliminate residues of oxidants (needed until that moment), like chlorine.
A safety cartridge filter set with filtering degree of 5 micron is installed on each line supplying water to the inverse osmosis units.

Inverse Osmosis Units

“Inverse” Osmosis is the process that occurs when a saline solution is placed in contact with a membrane permeable to water (and not to dissolved solids) at a pressure exceeding the osmotic pressure of the solution. A solution (permeate) with saline content lower than the initial solution flows through the membrane, while a solution rich of salts (concentrate) is obtained outside the membrane.

The pre-treated water has a residual pressure of about 2- 2.5 bar, suitable to feed the inverse osmosis units. An energy recovery unit is installed in each inverse osmosis train.

This system does not require maintenance and is called Pressure Exchanger. The installed PX system is a direct movement unit that reduces the capacity of the high-pressure delivery pump with remarkable energy saving (around 40%). The energy produced by the concentrate transfers its pressure to a supply flow of the same capacity, conveyed towards the unit. Despite this operation takes place with very high efficiency, an auxiliary pump is required to increase the value of the delivery pressure to the osmotic modules by about 3 bar.

Post-treatment

All the water produced is conveyed to a large collection tank where, in order to ensure potability, sodium hypochlorite is dosed for the final disinfection and sodium hydroxide for the correction of pH and alkalinity.

Supervision and Control System

In the above described desalination system, the on-site instruments guarantee the constant monitoring of process parameters, managed by the automation and control panel. The control and supervision software is supplied and the operator station, which includes a PC, monitors operations with graphic pages that show the system’s layout and control points, and a printer. The supervision software allows monitoring and complete interaction with the process through graphic colour pages that show the layout of the system’s flow, the various operating machines and field instruments; in addition, supervision can also be performed from a remote station.

Membrane Rinsing and Cleaning System

The progressive clogging of osmotic modules can take place over time despite due precautions, effective pre-treatment and proper maintenance of the system.

The membrane clogging period depends on the efficiency of the pre-treatment system and efficacy of the anti-precipitating agent used. There are only a few systems that never require washing procedures and systems where said operations are required only once a year or even once every two years. In any case, OMC recommends to perform regular washing operations, at least once-twice a year to maintain the membranes in perfectly efficient conditions.

The membranes must be washed during their initial clogging stage.

Washing is recommended when one or more of the following parameters vary between 10 – 15%

– increase of the permeate’s conductivity

– increase of the pressure difference

– increase of the delivery pressure

– decrease of production

This chemical washing operation of the membranes is generally performed in about 2 hours.

Management of the Order

ACQUISITION OF THE ORDER

BASIC AND DETAILED ENGINEERING PROJECT

SUPPLY OF MATERIALS

ASSEMBLY

SYSTEM START-UP

OPTIMISATION OF PERFORMANCES

CONSTRUCTION TIME 12 MONTHS

Related Products

Reverse Osmosis

 

Filtration

 

Contact US


I ACCEPT I declare that I have read and accepted the privacy policy pursuant to art. 13 of Legislative Decree no. 196/2003 and I consent to the processing of personal data for promotional and commercial purposes.

Related Products

Reverse Osmosis

 

Filtration

 

Contact US


I ACCEPT I declare that I have read and accepted the privacy policy pursuant to art. 13 of Legislative Decree no. 196/2003 and I consent to the processing of personal data for promotional and commercial purposes.